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To navigate this website, use this Sitemap and/or our local search tool.

Table of Contents

Because this website is still in its initial phase of development, and I am still experimenting with the type of content we’re going to have and how I’m going to organize it, I have not yet committed to a fixed navigational structure which can be easily embodied in a navigation menu (typically formatted as a vertical or horizontal bar of links, at the top/bottom/side of a Web page, whereby visitors access the main website sections). This kind of navigation menu provides a quick visual overview of the contents of a website, without which it is easy to lose our bearings in multidimensional cyberspace.

I have always assumed that visitors would move through the Roses website using the context-sensitive links provided on each page, combined with frequent queries to our local search engine, the index for which is updated every time I post any new content to this website. (In contrast, Google has been crawling and indexing this website in piecemeal fashion since February 2011, and still hasn’t covered all of its original content, let alone everything which I’ve posted recently. This means that search engine results pages [SERPs] returned by Google and the other big commercial search engines are incomplete and unreliable descriptions of what’s available on the Internet, as well as being rigged. For more on this, see our FYI page on Search Engine Shenanigans.)

In addition to hand-crafting a variety of context-sensitive text links for every Roses Web page — I call this artisanal linking (as distinguished from the sort of Big Data-driven automated linking done by artificial intelligence) — I have followed design conventions in adding image-based navigational aids. Website sections and content categories (“historical,” “FYI,” “sitemap,” etc.) are identified in the banner graphic at the top of most pages, and clicking/tapping on a banner graphic will automatically take you to the Roses home page, as will clicking/tapping on any of the rose graphics used as ornamental tail-pieces throughout the site.

Nevertheless, this method of local website navigation becomes cumbersome once a website has more than about 5 pages. With a complex, unconventional website such as Roses (as of October 2016, comprising 57 distinct HTML pages, several of which contain well over 200KB of ASCII text), visitors end up unable to see the forest for the trees, without global website navigation aids such as a simple sitemap. Hoping to provide a useful overview of website resources, I decided to add this Table of Contents page (first posted on 5/20/2013), which gives an annotated list of all primary content pages at Roses. (“Under Construction” pages, such as John Aubrey’s Pennsylvania Connection and our generic placeholder page, plus other Web pages oriented to administrivia, such as the URL redirect for our FYI page on Conversations About a Wiser Use of Our Health Care Dollars & Resources, are not included in this Table of Contents.)

Primary content pages come in two formats: regularly-sized main pages, such as our FYI page on The Growing Body of Evidence Connecting Cancers to the Modern Retail Economy, and reduced-size pages designed to open in a small, floating second window, such as the illustrated webessay introducing Mary Trye (fl. 1662–75). These second-window pages function like appendices or magazine sidebars, and are sized so that they can be stacked and opened alongside the main page they complement on devices with large screens (e.g., desktop and laptop computers). Such juxtapositions are especially useful when doing scholarly research, and when reading digital editions such as Thomas Tryon’s The Planter’s Speech to his Neighbours & Country-Men of Pennsylvania, East & West-Jersey ... (1684), where you can float the editor’s introduction on top of the calling page containing Tryon’s primary text (if your computer has JavaScript enabled). I have also used floating second-window files for pop-ups (“hover notes” clustered as end notes), as explained in our FYI page on A Note about this Website’s Use of Pop-Ups.

In addition to navigating this site using the following Table of Contents, I recommend that you make frequent use of our local search tool, in combination with your browser’s Find command:

H I N T     

Most search engines — including our local KSearch engine — will position you at the top of a Web page, rather than at the keyword(s) you searched on. To quickly locate your search terms within a single HTML page, use your browser’s Find command. For example, for computers running under a Windows operating system:

• type Ctrl+F to open a special Find box
• then type your search term(s) in the browser’s Find box
• then use the Next (or down arrowhead) and Previous (or up arrowhead) buttons near the Find box to jump to each occurrence of the search term/phrase on a page. (In some browsers, F3 works as a keyboard shortcut for the Next button.)

I also recommend that you use your browser’s Reload current page button (keyboard shortcut: F5; or right-click for context-sensitive menu with Reload current page button/command), if you find yourself visiting the same page a lot. This will ensure that your browser accesses the server (rather than your computer’s cache) to retrieve the requested Web page, and you will know that what you’re seeing is the most-recently updated content available. (This is especially pertinent to those FYI pages which have a media-links section, with unannounced revisions, including new links to older material I’ve found that won’t appear at the top of the list.) The dates at the bottom of a page allow you to track whether there have been changes to content (revisions) and/or code (updates) since your last visit.

PLEASE NOTE: I don’t record all content changes made to Roses website pages in our announcements blog: only those which I want to single out for some reason. Nor do I have any plans to add a subscriber-list feature which would allow you to easily track website edits & updates (I’m just one person, and I already have more than enough to do as it is! ;-).

I may encourage subscribers to sign up with us at some point in the future, once the website has matured more.

In the meantime, please use the following sitemap (which I promise to keep updated) and our KSearch query box (at the top and/or bottom of all regularly-sized main Web pages) in order to move around Roses and find what you’re looking for.

Panel from "Roses", a mixed-media work by Tuck Contreras

Roses website pages

ornament  WHAT’S BLOOMING news page (for Roses announcements and updates)
First Published: 14 May 2012.  |  Revised: 5 January 2017.
With 6 sidebars (each designed to open in a small, floating second window):

ornament  HOME page for Roses website
First Published: January 2011.  |  Revised: 13 December 2016.

ornament  SUPPORT US page (for making TLS/SSL-secured donations to Roses, with information about why I have chosen to make Roses a new kind of for-profit organization)
First Published: January 2011.  |  Revised: 20 March 2017.

E-publications (unique digital editions relating to the history of medicine & the history of health care in the Americas)

ornament  Medical Case Study:  A 17th-century surgeon describes excising a French woman’s noli me tangere (touch-me-not) — a deadly cancer affecting the nose, mouth and/or throat — in June of 1684, and reports on his autopsy of the area after her death circa year-end 1686. Published in a 1697 issue of the oldest continuous scientific journal, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Illustrated HTML transcript.
First Published: 21 January 2016.  |  Revised: 25 January 2016.

ornament  Medical Case Study:  A 17th-century surgeon describes a 64-year-old French woman’s bout with colon cancer, 1689–1691, and his autopsy of her diseased intestines. Published in a 1697 issue of the oldest continuous scientific journal, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Illustrated HTML transcript.
First Published: 21 January 2016.  |  Revised: 2 March 2016.

ornament  Medical Case Study:  A 17th-century surgeon’s description of his father’s cancer, which began with a small bruise to the cheekbone, and metastasized to the brain, killing him c.1682. Published in a 1702 issue of the oldest continuous scientific journal, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Illustrated HTML transcript.
First Published: 30 December 2015.  |  Revised: 5 January 2016.

ornament  The first debate over gun control — as a public health issue — in America: Thomas Tryon’s The Planter’s Speech to his Neighbours & Country-Men of Pennsylvania, East & West-Jersey ... (1684). Illustrated HTML transcript.
First Published: May 2014.  |  Revised: n/a.

ornament  The first protest against slavery printed in America: George Keith’s An Exhortation & Caution to Friends Concerning Buying or Keeping of Negroes (New York, 1693). Illustrated HTML transcript.
First Published: May 2014.  |  Revised: 11 June 2014.

ornament  Two excerpts from Ludwik Fleck’s Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact (“interpretive” Eng. trans., 1979; original German edn., 1935). Illustrated HTML transcript.
First Published: December 2013.  |  Revised: 29 April 2015.

Pages in our FYI (For Your Information) series

ornament  our FYI page on the subject of Cancer and Modern Consumerism, where you can learn more about the growing body of evidence connecting cancers to the modern retail economy (and what we can do about it, as buyers & sellers), with annotated list of media links
First Published: May 2012.  |  Revised: 16 February 2017.
With 6 sidebars (each designed to open in a small, floating second window):

ornament  our FYI page on Conversations About a Wiser Use of Our Health Care Dollars & Resources, which offers a unique historical perspective on rising health care costs and the role of phronesis (practical wisdom) in a revitalized, virtue-based ethic for medicine, with an extensive list of annotated links to media coverage of the debate over Obamacare (aka the Affordable Care Act) and health care reform in the U.S.
First Published: May 2013.  |  Revised: 25 March 2017.
With 8 sidebars — each designed to open in a small, floating second window — on related topics in the history of medicine:

NOTE: As of 11/4/2013, the burgeoning media links section of our FYI page on “Conversations About a Wiser Use of Our Health Care Dollars & Resources” merits a caution to visitors. I have designed the page to load quickly, but the file’s increasing size will eventually result in noticeably longer load times than I typically accept. Nonetheless, I have chosen not to break it into multiple, smaller files because it’s easiest to browse and search the links when they’re clustered in one file, which you only need to download once. Some day, we will reach a tipping point (when enough website visitors complain about load times ;-) and I will be forced to make different trade-offs. But we have a ways to go yet, before we end up pushing the limits of everyone’s patience....

ornament  our FYI page on Protecting Yourself against Medical Identity Theft
First Published: November 2012. | Revised: n/a.

ornament  our FYI page on California’s Internet Sales Tax, and the ongoing battle with online retailers such as Amazon.com over tax reform, with annotated list of media links
First Published: July 2011.  |  Revised: 7 February 2017.
With 1 sidebar (designed to open in a small, floating second window):

ornament  our FYI page on Powell’s City of Books Partner Program Update, terminating their California-based partner accounts (as of 8/29/2012)
First Published: August 2011. | Revised: n/a.

ornament  our FYI page on Pop-Ups and this website’s use of “hover” boxes for scholarly notes
First Published: May 2012.  |  Revised: 12 May 2016.

Tribute Gifts pages

ornament  the Roses TRIBUTE GIFTS page (also a secure page, with SSL Certificate, for making donations to Roses)
First Published: January 2011. | Revised: 20 November 2016.

ornament  our GUIDELINES for creating Roses Tribute Gifts page (another secure page, with SSL Certificate, for making donations to Roses)
First Published: January 2011. | Revised: 11 June 2014.

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administrivia — My thanks to Conrad Taylor, who coined this marvellous term! ::